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TREVOR GIBBS MODEL RAILROAD PAGE -

Part 13 – A Few More Projects

MAIN

MODEL PAGE 2

MODEL CHASSIS

LATHE TURNING 1

LATHE TURNING 2

LATHE TURNING 3

OPERATING THE LAYOUT

Ersatz Ground Signals

TRANSISTOR THROTTLES I USE

SCALE SPEED

FURTHER PICTURES

OTHER PROJECTS

EXHIBITIONS

SIMPLE MODEL  STREET LIGHTS 

PASSES

SIMPLE CUTOUT BUILDINGS 

BASIC SEARCHLIGHT SIGNALS  

THE BUDDS!!! NEW "CANADIAN" TREES!   THE GRAIN ELEVATOR  

ST AGNES RAILWAY MAP

ONE OF MY TIMETABLES

  MRE HINTS
AND TIPS
***
NEW
SIMPLE TO MAKE LQ SIGNALS
 

Just because one has a smaller layout does not stop some of the enjoyment of Model Railroading with different projects on the go. Here are a few of the things I did during 2003 and prior...

The signals which govern the entrance and exit to Ridgehaven. They are simply brass tube with a single wire and the body of the bidirectional LED using one of the legs of the LED as a support soldered to the tube and a turned styrene offcut to make the target... which could be done in a home drill chuck if you were stuck for a lathe! The signal battery and relay control boxes were also made out of scrap styrene laminated etc and grooved to shape with nails and razor saws to give the effect of timber where required... Cost virtually zilch!

As for the signals, They have now been painted and are operational but the one on the left has been replaced with a two searchlight signal to cover operation of the "passing siding"

The ON car behind the Budds has been modernised and its roof painted in a galvanised colour






This is one of the “Ersatz Ground Signals' which are described on another page with a LED fitted to it.

At time of writing, it was still a fouling peg marker. Part of my “reluctance” is that I am trying to work out if a logic circuit could be introduced to operate the signals as a group. It is now operating and driven by two SPST switches



This was taken before I learned where the macro function on my camera was... typical that a kid will know more about it than myself!

The two larger engines are Mantua engines, the Berkshire 2-8-4 that I re-motored and a Mantua Pacific fitted with a Sagami motor ex factory. It runs magnificently although the overhang is a little extreme on my curves due to the shorter wheelbase.

The CN Caboose in the top left hand corner is my own reworking of an Athearn Wide Vision caboose Point St Charles van of a few years ago. Again I was not working with drawings trying to interpret this. It is minus the distinctive window frames which I have worked out a good way of doing them, courtesy of an article in Australian Model Railway Magazine by my friend Wayne Hoskin.

You guessed it... there's another project!


This is a model based on the Model Railroader article for North Conway station. I had a studio art class in late 2003 where I applied model building to the skills of the students.

The roof is masking tape which when painted will represent tar paper. The windows have not been done yet but these will come in clear styrene from food packaging while the frames will be computer printed, cut out and stuck on from leftover label prints.

A covered platform will come out from the left and create a “bay platform” where the RDC's can layover. My only hassle is that this building outsizes and reduces the apparent size of the layout. I have contemplated cutting the ground floor off and lowering its height... we shall see!



This is the view looking to the main layout. I have had several fiddle yards before using these boards which is why you can see the caneite/homasote around the track base. However they became maintenance frankenstein's particularly when I went to make one a “branch” and awkward for one operator. This has been by far the best option and is used for storage and a fiddle yard at the moment. To accommodate the extra steam engines I have acquired, I am contemplating putting in a diesel depot roughly where the trees are laying on their sides now.

This is the station known as  “Reginald Bridge” after my friend Reg Bridge who passed away in 2001... who among other things taught me to make the switches on this extension. The building in the previous frame is vaguely reminiscent of Murray Bridge station in South Australia... to me at least.

The throttle on the tether is one of those described elsewhere.






This is a fairly well worn trackside shed done as an exercise.

The grain work has been teased using a razor saw and scribing implement fro the “planks”. The door is worse for wear having faced the sun from the nearby window for a while and consequently buckled.

However the source of the model is the interest which is in the next photo...








Voila... one yoghurt container which has been recycled! The “ribbing” inside also came from the rim of the same container. I have also used margarine containers for the same effects, and although the material is thin, it works reasonably well with MEK etc .

A an example of other recycling, the bridge on the other side of the layout has pylons made from disposable shavers, although that particular effort is not very believable so you won't see close ups until it has some degree of “yes it could be!”

“When God invented junk, He must have been thinking of model railroaders!”

 

This Budd mechanism was fitted to an Athearn RDC by my friend Wayne Hoskin in Adelaide. I did have a cruder version which was an SW 7 switcher truck spliced onto the frame driven by various motors over the years including a typewriter motor and a vending machine motor scrounged from different sources after being initially disappointed with a Spud unit.

The mechanism was made by K&M in Australia and its only fault is that it does not pickup from both sides but it is OK and runs well. It is powerful enough for a couple of trailers.

And in an effort to recycle, the typewriter motor is still going strong... in the CP Rail F7!







This Budd body has become a CN Budd along with its running mate but needs a bit of paining and detail work! I stripped this a few times but could not get it right with the main black stripe... and I resorted to hand painting it

The fluting was stripped from the front and doors at both ends. The blue paint is a remnant when it was painted as a South Australian Bluebird car... it just did not work for me at least!

The paint stand is another one of those yoghurt containers... but rest assured I am not necessarily the picture of good health!